OC for you.

      • @ZytaZiouZ@lemm.ee
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        6
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        6 months ago

        Like the other person commented, I would suggest trying Krita (open source/native painting or graphics program. That isn’t my forte, but my understanding is Krita is a professional grade program that is actually used for professional work.

        Edit: I ironically found this: https://docs.krita.org/fr/user_manual/introduction_from_other_software/introduction_from_sai.html

        With that said, there is a useful program to help setup Wine called “Bottles”. It’s all graphical, and gives tons of options to tweak to try to get programs running. It has dramatically helped me get done other odd professional type software running.

        One long shot thing to try: check the file properties of the program installed on wine, and make sure “executable” is enabled. It’s a handy security thing to prevent random files from hiding malware, but can be a pain to new users.

        An extreme solution is running a program in a Windows virtual machine. If you go that route, I highly recommend doing some research. The simplest to me solution I’ve found is Virtualbox, and I believe you can even directly pass USB devices through to the virtual machine, but since of the other solutions are supposed to work better.

      • @Sureito@feddit.de
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        56 months ago

        Two things:

        • Could be Wayland. I had wine troubles in the past because if that
        • Have you tried Krita?
        • TheEmpireStrikesDak
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          26 months ago

          I’m too noob to know what either of those things are. I looked them up and I’m still scratching my head lol

          Yesterday was only my second time logging onto the Linux box, so I have a lot to learn.

          I tried on both wine and playonlinux, but had the same issue both times. So I’ll try a simple text editor or something and see if that works.

          I really don’t wanna have to go back to Windows.

          • @ArcaneSlime@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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            46 months ago

            Kitra is a different drawing program native to linux. Linux also has native text editors, is there a reason you need these specific windows programs or would an alternative work, like gedit instead of windows notepad?

            • TheEmpireStrikesDak
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              16 months ago

              The text editor I’ll try just to see if I’m doing the installation properly, nothing else.

              I paid for SAI and I’ve used it for about 15 years. I really love it. My artwork is all saved in SAI format. Worst case, I’ll have to install it on the windows hard drive.

          • Captain Aggravated
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            46 months ago

            Wayland = the GUI protocol. I’ll try to build up the short version: Linux is modular, you don’t have to have a GUI at all to run Linux. Most GUI systems themselves are modular, but a core component of the Linux GUI for a very long time has been a thing called X11. X11 is old and busted. Wayland is the new hotness. Some distros are using Wayland now. It offers some cool features that X11 either struggles with or can’t do at all, but on the other hand there’s lots of software that still doesn’t work well with Wayland yet. I’ve been a Linux user for 10 years and the transition has been in the works the entire time.

            Krita = a raster image editor/art app from KDE, the impression I get is that it’s really made for digital drawing and painting, with some photo editing capabilities. GIMP (The GNU Image Manipulation Program) is more for “photoshopping.” For vector art I would go with Inkscape.

          • @MiddledAgedGuy@beehaw.org
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            36 months ago

            So you’re brand new to Linux and you’re already hacking away at something you don’t understand well. Good for you! That’s how you learn 😊.

            That being said, getting (as you’re learning) and keeping software running in wine can be frustrating. I’d suggest using an open source alternative if possible. Hopefully the one others recommended is a good fit for you. And a bonus, one less piece of proprietary software you rely on, which imo is always a good feeling.

            Good luck, and welcome to Linux!

            • TheEmpireStrikesDak
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              16 months ago

              Thanks, man. Well it’s on its own hd and I don’t have anything important on it, so why not mess around. I’ve been wanting a Linux box since 2000 haha finally got my dream.

              Do you reckon it’s worth trying to install any of these? XD

              I got notepad++ to install via play on Linux, so I think it’s just this particular program that’s not cooperating.

              https://askubuntu.com/questions/1048242/wine-crashes-when-trying-to-open-an-app-through-playonlinux

              This is the exact same issue I’m having. In the end I just installed all my art stuff on Windows :(

              • @ZytaZiouZ@lemm.ee
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                26 months ago

                With Linux 99% of the time you should use the software repository or “store” or “Discover”. You’ll get the latest supported version on your Linux, it takes care of updating, and in my experience it’s worlds more reliable than Windows store. Also poke around and see what’s available; it’s all free software and should be perfectly safe.

                  • @MiddledAgedGuy@beehaw.org
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                    16 months ago

                    sudo is “super user do”. The equivalent of Run as Administrator in Windows for whatever command suffixes it. Ideally you don’t want to use this unless you have to, but it might take some time to learn where that line is.

                    What they’re talking about is a gui based software installer. I assume it runs the dnf or apt or whatever commands for you.

              • @MiddledAgedGuy@beehaw.org
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                16 months ago

                Oh man trying to run old Linux software on a modern distro would be a painful experience!

                Your desktop environment may already come with a capable text editor with syntax highlighting and all that. You should give a go.

                • TheEmpireStrikesDak
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                  16 months ago

                  Oh the notepad thing was just a test to see if it was me or the software. I wonder if Linux has something like the old htmlkit. I never did find anything to replace it on Windows.